There is no gender pay gap, people get what they're worth

No, women are not paid less than men. Women choose to make less than men. It's common sense and it's commonly misunderstood.

by Quinton Figueroa on May 7th, 2016

The numbers are BS

First of all, the numbers you always hear about are such BS to anybody that spends more than 1 minute researching it. We commonly hear that women make $0.77 for every $1.00 men make. That's true, but do you care to know why? Because women work jobs that pay less. Nobody forces women to work these jobs, they choose them. And they can choose any job they want. And when women as a whole work jobs that pay more, woman as a whole make more relative to men.


I am paid less than a man because vagina

If I were to tell you that the CEO of a company makes more money than the janitor of a company you would say that makes sense (unless you went to a government school (AKA: everyone)). If the janitor made $0.01 for every $1.00 the CEO made, that would be perfectly justified because the CEO is doing work which is more valuable and justifies a higher salary. But as soon as this same thing happens with women people get all flustered about it. People have a hard time with numbers and rational arguments, especially when politicians tell these women they're victims (where have I seen this before?).

The numbers you see talking about the gender pay gap do not take into account the type of work, the hours worked or even the supply and demand of the position. So in other words, these numbers treat all jobs the same. This is one of the most dishonest and manipulative things you could do. And for people to go around touting these numbers and these sources as facts are some of the most illiterate and/or deceptive people around. If you're older than a then you're used to this kind of logic.

Women are more expensive for employers

Women take maternity leave. Women take more time off. Women work less hours. Women take less risks. And the list goes on. Why do I have to even tell you this? It's obvious. Women are built biologically different than men. Women have babies, men do not. This is why traditionally men worked while women stayed home with the children through their early years. If you want to work like a man, then work like a man. But you can't have it both ways. You can't expect to be paid like a man if you are not working like a man.


High paying female job... oh wait.

Women generally take on jobs that pay less than men. Women would much rather be a school teacher than an engineer or scientist. School teachers don't make as much as engineers because of something called supply and demand. There is a big demand for people to create products that make our lives better. This is why so many people love buying new iPhones. There isn't a big demand for school teachers. This is why school teachers make less than the people building iPhones. It's called markets. And markets represent what people want. And the very people arguing that they are mad about their wage are the very people choosing to buy products from high wage people and not low wage people. Earther logic.


Low risk, low paying job... oh wait.

Women also work less risky jobs. Men are stronger than women. This is a biological fact. Men can do construction or operate an oil rig better than a woman because these types of jobs require strength. Women aren't as strong so they're not going to do as well in these types of jobs. This is common sense. There are some jobs that are more geared towards women. You don't hear men complaining about that. Different people are better at different things. And different people have preferences for different things. All of these factors, as well as a whole number of other factors, go in to determining how much you make.

Some women get paid less

I hear about how there are very clear examples of an employer exploiting a woman and paying her less than a man. Yeah, and some men get exploited and paid less too. There are always exceptions. So? It's the general trend that matters. Of course some women get paid less. And if they don't like it they can quit. And if the business paying her less is doing it because she is a woman then it is really going to hurt them when she quits and they can't pay the next person the low wage. The market has a way of working all of these nuances out way better than any social justice warrior government ever could. Market forces take everything into account and all of these forces are built into the wage of the employee.

Women models make more


I DEMAND EQUAL PAY!!!!!

Women dominate the modeling (and porn and prostitution) industry but you never hear much about this. Women models are in much higher demand than male models and as such the price for female models is higher than male models. Why don't we ever hear much talk about this? Why aren't men screaming for equality in modeling and porn? Why don't men demand equal pay for equal work! After all, a man having sex in a porn film is doing just as much work, if not more work, than a woman. Why is he making less? I demand equality for all men! This is an outrage!! Or, it's just supply and demand. The market, as determined by where people spend their money, is much more geared towards women making more in these industries and men making less.

Easy way to pay 23% less on employees

But of course, if none of this made sense to you then there is the most obvious point: if women really were paid 23% less than men for the same work, then rich, greedy, Capitalistic businessmen that you love to hate on would hire 100% women and save 23% on their salaries. Greedy, Capitalist pigs will sell their soul to save an extra 1% on an employees salary. So if the gender pay gap is so true then all of these Capitalists would immediately fire all their men and replace them with women. But they don't do that, you know why? Cause it's complete BS. Women are not cheaper. Men are not more expensive. People are people. And businesses and the market account for all the possible variations and preferences of people when calculating their wage.

If you don't like your wage quit. If you're getting exploited quit. If you're not happy quit. If nobody is hiring women then hire women yourself. Nobody is forcing you to work for them. And nobody is keeping you from paying women the same if they really are being exploited. It's all just lip service people like to pay because they would rather feel good with words than do good with actions. Way to go guys.

 Filed under: Politics / Government, Equal Pay For Inequal Work, Bad With Numbers, Reasons To Pay Less, Only In America, 23% Off Female Employees, Intelligence Gap, Greedy Women

About The Author

Quinton Figueroa

Quinton Figueroa

Facebook @slayerment YouTube

Los Angeles, CA

I am an entrepreneur at heart. Throughout my whole life I have enjoyed building real businesses by solving real problems. Business is life itself. My goal with businesses is to help move the human ...

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14 Comments

Not stupid like you: Not stupid like you

I can't believe I had to read that opinion column. All your opinions here are full of baseless shit like the rest of your articles. You just wasted 5 minutes of my time.

Quinton Figueroa: Not an argument.
@Not stupid like you (view comment)

Not an argument.

i dont want to be heard. i want to be listened to.: agreed. not looking for an
@Not stupid like you (view comment)

agreed. not looking for an arguement, but don't you think it is because more cases of underpaid women occured than men, so there was more intiative taken for the matter? just a thought.

it was a well known historical fact that even after the industrial revolution, women make less than men in most cultures, as their money goes back to the men of their family most of the time anyways. you cannot just so quickly judge something just because people feel that they have to justify something? and as a man, i think you have a more biased account from your point of view, but hey, i can take that. i enjoy wasting my life when i have nothing to live for, and debates make me happy.

Quinton Figueroa: No, I don't think this.
@i dont want to be heard. i want to be listened to. (view comment)

No, I don't think this.

j b: " and as a man, i think you
@i dont want to be heard. i want to be listened to. (view comment)

" and as a man, i think you have a more biased account from your point of view, "

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oqyrflOQFc

Here explained by a women with source in the video.

j b: "I can't believe I had to
@Not stupid like you (view comment)

"I can't believe I had to read that opinion column. All your opinions here are full of baseless shit like the rest of your articles. " -troll(Not stupid like you)

The fact women work less hours than men, take jobs with less risk, use more vacation and sick leave than men. Then radical feminist have the audacity to expect the same pay of men who worked harder.
Women have better health care than men, access to more health programs, and live longer in first world countries. Sorry if the facts are inconvenient proven in status census and labor departments.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oqyrflOQFc

Sam: People are not identical

The constant trait I find in people with low intelligence is how literally they take statements. They look up a word in the dictionary and expect it to apply to real life.

Equality means the playing field should be even so that people can compete without unfair advantages or disadvantages. In other words, to prevent anyone cheating. It does NOT mean everyone should win or lose together on a curve and every other factor be ignored if it doesn't all equal 100% at the end.

It does NOT mean everyone needs to be stripped of their talent, experience, skill set, work ethic, gender and everything else that makes a valuable employee - and ignore them
In the name of "equality."

By definition, this is exactly what "equality" actually would mean; forcing everyone to be identical. But ONLY in a dictionary. Not in reality.

Women earn less than men because they gravitate towards lower paying fields - this has been proven. There are more Asian engineers than blacks because they're better at math. It's not because of racism. What is the solution? Force companies to hire more black engineers? Where does it stop?

I know plenty of women who are smarter and more successful than men. I also know plenty of women who are morons. People are people are nothing about them is identical - so why pretend like they are?

The absolutely is no gap in wages. People get paid what they're worth, period. Companies hire employees because they're in it to make profit. They don't hire or fire people because they remake or female - they do so because that's what employee deserves.

Outside of school systems, real life businesses operate to earn profit. It's not a big conspiracy. If female labor was cheaper than make labor, companies would only hire women.

Why do people literally expect this definition tlnbe accurate? That's not what it means.

If a certain gender or nationality excels of fails in any area of society (jobs, businesses, schools, etc.) you do not need to immediately link these results to that groups gender or race. Of course there are gender me race related positive and negatives associated with any group. So what? Does that make it sexist or racist just because someone is offended?

If women make less than men (which they do in reality but not because of sexism) it's because that's what the economy demands. It has nothing to do with their gender.

People need to step thinking like victims. Worse, stop making victim blanket statements and forcing others to become victims. Every single woman I work with - who are successful, self made and extremely tenacious - hate when people victimize and make blanket statements about women. They perpetuate the stereotype that women cannot compete in the marketplace without people feeling sorry for them. TRUE equality means not pointing the finger at people looking for ways to victimize their situations and say they're being held back - yet in the same breath, also saying they don't want special testament.

Most of the people replying with such comments likely have little or no exeoreince in the real world. It's obvious by their thought process and ideals.

If you want to be a victim - go ahead - but stop perpetuating the victim mentality and hurting genders and races with this rhetoric.

Anonymous: Eat shit and die.

Eat shit and die.

Anonymous: I hope you die a painful

I hope you die a painful death.

Hugh Mungus: Oh look, considerate
@Anonymous (view comment)

Oh look, considerate feminists hiding behind keyboards spewing senseless bs!

Hiram: Good read. I like the tone.

Good read. I like the tone. So many articles are written in a sort of call to action tone that it's refreshing to read something that has a light side to it.

I've read enough studies to have an opinion on this, but I'll keep it to myself here. Only criticism is you should cite your sources, I would have liked to see the studies you pulled your information from (although a quick google search did get me there anyway).

Sean: Inexperienced Social Justice Warriors

As a member of the Armed Services, women make EXACTLY the same pay that I do for rank, and time in service. That being said, you tend to forget far too often that women are also often "Silently consenting" to wage agreements upon employment. Women tend to be less willing to negotiate in a professional setting than they are in private settings because they are nurtured to believe that they "rule the house" and as such develop negotiation skills which are not suited for a professional environment. The fact is that upon employment for any job that is not weighted by an hourly wage for position, there is a part of an interview which is salary expectations. Men tend to be more prepared to argue the value of their skills, talents, and experiences for the value of compensation. Women tend to negate such a a negotiation through fear of the idea that they will seem "Pushy" or "entitled." As an employer, I have plenty of experience in these employment negotiations. The simple fact is that women undervalue themselves, and it is not the responsibility of an employer to cut profit margins to support better salaries for the benefit of any demographic of employees to feel "equal." Additionally, if you actually look into the numbers a bit more, you'll realize that more unemployed women receive tax-backed social welfare benefits than men, and working men with child support payments pay incommensurate percentages of income for support, than working women do for men. If you want equality, good, lets have equality. If you want to be a victim, play your card. Either way, Math doesn't lie. Do some research before you become outraged.

斯坦利stanley: Yeah ... Basically it's like

Yeah ... Basically it's like trying to employ a woman in the army.... These women don't know how hard it is for us to see our women in the army... I mean protection naturally is for men,but eish,women are too stubborn and can't see beyond all this .... Some jobs are just too risky to have women employed in.. It's a fact.

Patriarchy: Educate yourself on the causes before analyzing the effects...

"As can be seen from the aforementioned economic trends and statistics, as well as the breakdown
of how gender is socially constructed, there is an obvious and overwhelming cause that has
perpetuated wage inconsistency and will continue to do so until gender norms are reevaluated.
This cause is socialization. According to Babcock and Lashever (2007), ideas about gender roles
and the pressures that surround them, vary drastically between men and women. It is society’s
constructed message that tells men and women to behave differently from one another, exhibit
gender specific traits and accept specific opportunity structures based on gender rather than
individual ability (p. 68). It is society’s message that tells women that they cannot be in positions
of power and continue to be “proper” women following their specific gender roles. It is society
that tells women that they must expect less than what they truly deserve and if they do expect
more, they are an anomaly. Sarah Silverman, a world-renowned comedian, addresses this issue
in a 2013 HBO special: “Stop telling girls they can be anything they want when they grow
up…Not because they can’t, but because it would have never occurred to them that they
couldn’t.” Although her statement is simple and to the point, it acknowledges a common
misconception within our society that girls must be told to strive for more because it is not within
their “genetics’ to do so naturally.

It is generally accepted that men are assertive, dominant, decisive, ambitious and selforiented.
Conversely, women are thought to be communal, expressive, nurturing, emotional and
warm. With these descriptors in mind, when a woman who is communal and therefore, more
focused on the welfare and well-being of others is compared and contrasted against a man who is
self-oriented and completely independent of other’s needs, it is obvious within a competitive
work environment which individual will progress faster and be more valued for their worth. Women who are raised to believe that the only proper way to be a woman is to be communal and nurturing are placed in a difficult position, both internally and socially, when they choose to act outside of their gender norm. Sheryl Sandberg (2013) in her book Lean In, describes the feelings that accompany a woman acting outside of her gender norm as feelings of inferiority and otherness; otherness being viewed from a solitary position where no other woman or man could relate (p. 24). Because stereotypes of working women are rarely attractive, Sandberg (2013) states that women must redefine their own gender role through what she calls stepping out
(stepping outside of the gender norm) and leaning in (embracing one’s redefined gender role and
demanding to be heard and valued rather than waiting for recognition to be given) (p. 25). For
most women there is an over-whelming fear that often accompanies strong statements of self.
For women in the workplace, redefining their gender role is often viewed as “butch” behavior or
bitchiness when, in actuality women are simply following the same self-oriented mindset that
men are socialized from birth to have (p.70).In the same vein, the socialization of women has
placed invisible barriers around service-oriented fields and college majors that men, whether
they consciously do so or not, tend to avoid. According to Philip Cohen’s (2013) opinion piece in
The New York Times, there is a substantial lack of movement of men into, what have always
been considered “feminine” careers, such as nursing, early-childhood education, and homemaking
(p. SR9). Cohen (2013) believes this stagnation in progress towards gender equality is
directly correlated to the glaring pay decrease those who take service-oriented positions must
face. In other words, “women’s work” does not pay the bills. Cohen (2013) raises an interesting
concept when suggesting that businesses’ distinct lack of development in regards to work-family
policies is a major, perhaps premeditated, obstacle for women who must try to properly and
effectively manage their careers along with their familial responsibilities. According to Cohen (2013), if more businesses offered women (and men) a more welcoming family-policy environment, more college-educated women within the United States would participate in the professional labor force and greater strides could be made towards minimizing and finally, eradicating the wage gap. Sheryl Sandberg (2013) provides a personal example paralleling Cohen’s idea that a friendlier family-policy environment is essential in today’s workforce.
Sandberg (2013) was running the online sales and operations groups at Google during her first
pregnancy in 2004. During this time Google was growing and parking was a difficult commodity
to find. Sandberg, on her way to an important client meeting, was forced to park quite far away
from her destination and because of this, struggled in not only arriving on time but in also
resisting the nausea that often accompanies the first trimester of pregnancy (p. 4). After
discovering that Yahoo had designated parking for expectant mothers, Sandberg took it upon
herself to demand to Google’s founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brian, that pregnancy parking be
implemented immediately. When confronted with the idea, Brian agreed and admitted that the
concept of pregnancy parking was never something he had thought about (p. 4). Sandberg (2013)
also admits in Lean In that before her own pregnancy the difficulties pregnant women faced in
everyday work situations had never occurred to her. Because of her position of power within the
company she felt comfortable enough to ask for what she needed but for many women, this
ability to demand is far more daunting than nine months of enduring in silence. By creating a
friendlier environment for professional expectant mothers, Google eliminated one of the many
obstacles that women who choose to balance a growing family and a professional career face on
a daily basis. Although it was something as simple as pregnancy parking it was a step in the right
direction for treating women’s needs as equal and relevant within the workforce.

There is no denying that the fate of women within the United States has improved
drastically since the early 1900s. It is also quite clear that the fate of women within the United
States is exponentially better than those experienced in many countries around the world. As
Sheryl Sandberg (2013) points out, women in the United States are not trapped in the sex trade
like 4.4 million others around the world; they are not lacking in civil rights or arrested for being
victims of rape; neither are they bound to their husbands as property and for that, women are
grateful (p. 5). But, just because things are not at their absolute worst does not mean that they
cannot be better. Knowing that, as women, they are socialized to resort to fear when striving to
be anything less than communal and nurturing, they are faced with the responsibility to fight to
be more than an underrepresented gender. The early equality struggles that so many strong
women fought for were not battled for future women to go to college and hang up their degree as
soon as a man sweeps them off their feet. As Judith Ronin stated, “My generation fought so hard
to give all of you choices. We believe in choices. But choosing to leave the workforce was not
the choice we thought so many of you would make (as cited in Sandberg, 2013, p. 14). Although
many of the obstacles women in the workforce face and often choose to leave behind are forced
upon them by institutional standards, the archaic “good ol’ boy” system, and the ever looming
umbrella of gender stereotypes, there are paths that should be followed in which women can
empower themselves and look forward to a future where hard work and success are measured on
the same wage scale as their male cohorts. In the next section, Sheryl Sandberg and her Lean In
campaign which is aimed towards encouraging women to pursue their ambitions and empower
themselves through the breakdown of internal barriers will be explored."

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